Ask a Vet Archive

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  • My fiancé and I have had my dog Wally for about two and a half months (he's a rescue). Wally is listed as a lab/terrier mix and about 1 year and 9 months. Ever since we've had him he's paid attention to his paws. In the beginning it was mostly licking and wasn't all that often so I thought it was sort of just like a habit or something behavioral. Our summer has been getting progressively more humid as the months have gone by and he has been paying more and more attention to his paws. About a week and a half ago we noticed one of the paws looked really red so we took him in. We were told dermatitis given antibiotics and arthritis meds and told to put him in a boot all the time. The meds gave him diarrhea so we put him on a bland diet. It wasn't looking better so we took him back in. They said it could be allergies, but to do the boot just for walks and a cone for inside and wipes for the feet along with probiotics. We've been doing this and now we are done with the antibiotics and his paw is still red/pink. It definitely looks improved but not completely healed. I'm scheduled to see the vet tomorrow, but today he started going after another one of his paws and was really chomping, not licking or nibbling. Obviously, Wally can't stay in the cone forever, he hates it and is starting to act out in it-barking and trying to bite. What can we do other than a cone to stop him from licking his paws but still allowing them to breath? We've cleaned the carpets. He's on different food, but he HATES the cone and were not seeing fast results for his paws. Its already been a week and I'm getting concerned he's going to be in this cone forever.

    Hi Naomi,
    I recommend that you talk about your concerns with your vet at Wally’s visit. It is good that his paw looks better but it is concerning that he is going after another one now. Your vet can talk to you about other potential treatment options after they have examined him.


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Tags

Behavior